Walker & Staff to Don Suits & Sneakers for Coaches vs. Cancer

ATLANTA, Ga. – Moravian College head men's basketball coach Jim Walker and his staff will wear sneakers instead of dress shoes with their usual game attire during the Saturday, Jan. 25 Landmark Conference contest against Susquehanna University at Johnston Hall at 2 p.m.

Susquehanna head coach Frank Marcinek and his staff will join the Greyhounds wearing sneakers on Saturday to demonstrate their support for the American Cancer Society during the 11th Annual Coaches vs. Cancer Suits & Sneakers Awareness Weekend. To show your support of Coach Walker's effort in the fight against cancer, the Greyhounds invite you to wear your sneakers to the game.

Walker is also in the midst of a 24-day free throw shooting marathon to raise money and awareness for cancer research. You can read more about Coach Walker's progress and learn how to donate to the cause here: Coach Walker Gives New Meaning to 'Charity Stripe'

Thanks to the dedicated efforts of college and high school coaches across the country, Coaches vs. Cancer participants have raised nearly $85 million since 1993 to help the Society save lives by educating and empowering people to avoid cancer or find it early, helping people facing cancer make decisions and overcome obstacles in their personal fight investing in research that yields groundbreaking discoveries into cancer's causes and cures and helping pass laws that fight cancer and keep our communities healthy.

To learn more, visit www.cancer.org/coaches or call 1-800-ACS-2345.

Suits and Sneakers weekend is an annual event coordinated by the Coaches vs. Cancer program, a nationwide collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches. Wearing sneakers is a simple way to spotlight the fact that cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States – exceeded only by heart disease, accounting for nearly 1 of every 4 deaths – and remind people about all the ways they can reduce their risk of cancer; like eating right, exercising, making healthy lifestyle choices and following the Society's recommended cancer screening guidelines.

The Coaches vs. Cancer Suits and Sneakers awareness weekend isn't just for coaches. Everyone can get involved through the Suits and Sneakers Challenge, which engages companies and basketball fans throughout the nation. As an extension of the weekend, corporations and organizations are encouraged to participate in the challenge by hosting a Wear Your Sneakers to Work Day.

Since 1993, participating coaches have helped raise more than $85 million for the American Cancer Society's lifesaving work. Coaches also lend their voices and leadership to fight back with lawmakers to make this world a healthier place to live. Visit coachesvscancer.org or "like" Coaches vs. Cancer on Facebook for the most up-to-date information about Suits and Sneakers.

About the American Cancer Society
The American Cancer Society combines an unyielding passion with nearly a century of experience to save lives and end cancer for good. As a global grassroots force of three million volunteers, we fight for every birthday threatened by every cancer in every community. We save lives by helping you stay well by preventing cancer or detecting it early, helping you get well by being there for you during and after a diagnosis, by finding cures through groundbreaking discovery and fighting back through public policy. As the nation's largest non-governmental investor in cancer research, contributing more than $3.8 billion, we turn what we know about cancer into what we do. As a result, an estimated 13.7 million people in America who have had cancer and countless more who have avoided it will be celebrating birthdays this year. To learn more about us or to get help, call us anytime, day or night, at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org.

About the National Association of Basketball Coaches
Located in Kansas City, Missouri, the NABC was founded in 1927 by Forrest "Phog" Allen, the legendary basketball coach at the University of Kansas. Allen, a student of James Naismith, the inventor of basketball, organized coaches into this collective group to serve as Guardians of the Game. The NABC currently claims nearly 5,000 members consisting primarily of university and college men's basketball coaches. All members of the NABC are expected to uphold the core values of being a Guardian of the Game by bringing attention to the positive aspects of the sport of basketball and the role coaches play in the academic and athletic lives of today's student-athletes. The four core values of being a Guardian of the Game are advocacy, leadership, service and education. Additional information about the NABC, its programs and membership, can be found at nabc.org.